Broad research areas

Four broad research areas (or pillars) provide multidisciplinary expertise to create essential knowledge and evidence to inform infection emergency preparedness and improve health outcomes for Australians.

The research areas are supported by four cross-cutting themes containing critical infrastructure and tools to ensure the greatest possible impact.

Together, the research areas (or pillars) and cross-cutting themes of APPRISE allow for a flexible and coordinated national network.

Examples of potential research outcomes include:

  • Clinical research and infection prevention – understanding the severity of the disease and strategies for new treatments, educating health professionals on emerging infectious threats
  • Public health – researching how the disease spreads through populations and how to monitor and assist communities
  • Laboratory research –developing new diagnostic tests for the disease, understanding transmission involving vectors, monitoring any human-to-animal infection risk
  • Key populations – working with communities and populations to ensure that all Australians have access to culturally appropriate interventions and services.
Clinical research and infection prevention

Clinical research and infection prevention

Research to help healthcare professionals understand the severity of diseases, who is susceptible and how best to assist people who are affected
Public health research

Public health research

Research to find effective methods for surveillance and public health data collection while working with healthcare professionals, governments and communities
Laboratory research

Laboratory research

Laboratory researchers need the capacity to rapidly provide information about emerging or re-emerging diseases
Key populations

Key populations

Research to understand which groups of people have a higher risk of being affected by an infectious disease emergency and how best to help them